Oh look, a BoJack Horseman review that actually talks about the asexual character!

Season 3 of BoJack was dark. It was good. It was all the things all the thinkpieces and reviews are saying, probably. (Although I wasn’t as charmed by the limited-dialogue underwater episode as everyone else apparently was? Whatever.)

But these reviews aren’t really talking about Todd’s storyline this season, in which we learn that he’s asexual.

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If Only TV Acknowledged Asexuality: “Faking It” 1×4 – “Know Thy Selfie”

Which came first, the girl or the company?

Which came first, the girl or the company?

The description of the fourth episode of Faking It is “Shane helps Amy determine if she’s attracted to girls or boys,” which is a questionable start after last week’s biphobia. The episode opens with Karma wishing she had normal parents as they hop out of a pink “Good Karma” truck right in a school courtyard, which seems less than legal, but whatever. They want to support their “proud lesbian daughter,” but also they “could use the money,” which is just a plot device to make Karma allow them to stay. They also unfurl a poster of Karma in a “kale suit,” which is hilarious.

Meanwhile, Amy asks Shane to find her a girlfriend, because she must be a lesbian if she feels this way about Karma. Shane says it’s too soon to “bust out the label-maker,” which is good, but odd, given how biphobic he was last week. Amy points out that Shane outed her, although it’s not being pointed out because it’s wrong, but because his current hesitation is hypocritical. Shane realizes now that Amy is “much more complicated and interesting.” He’s in it for the drama.

Amy’s stressed because she didn’t enjoy kissing Oliver, but thinks she should have: “He makes really cool cranes!” She also finding a “real girlfriend” means her “fake girlfriend can go back to being [her] best friend.” Shane asks, “That’s what this is about?” as though Amy’s struggle to figure out her sexuality isn’t valid or urgent enough on its own. Shane says he’ll help Amy, “both because [he] can see [she’s] in pain and because [he’s] dying to see how this plays out.” Shane remains terrible, if entertaining, and he’s the only help Amy has. (Somehow. In a very open school. He’s the only out queer kid. I won’t get over it.)

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